Tuesday, June 2, 2020

The Masked Man and the Masked Woman


We are living in an entirely unexpected time.  Masks have become a required component of our public wardrobe.  I don’t know anyone who likes, or wants, to wear a mask.  But the whole mask thing gives us a good bit to ponder.

The invasion of the Covid virus has generated a good bit of controversy as to how seriously we need to take it.  Some see it as no more than a bad flu, though the mainstream view is to take it far more seriously.  Along with the diverse opinions about the virus itself and how to best respond to its presence, there are diverse opinions about masks.  On the one hand, some people regard mask wearing as personal protection and then extend that perspective to regard mask wearing as a symbol of fear, and optional.  On the other hand, others view masks as a necessary and appropriate means of participating in community health.  Regardless of your perspective on the matter, wearing a mask carries with it a good bit of Biblical support.

Medical professionals have made it quite clear that the purpose of the wearing a mask is not to protect ourselves nearly as much as it is to protect others from our own virus particles should we be housing any.  And from that viewpoint, Christians have a vested interest in mask wearing.  It is now what love looks like.  In his letter to the Philippian church, the Apostle Paul tells his readers to regard others as more important than themselves.  We believers now have a unique opportunity to choose to wear an uncomfortable and stifling mask as a way of caring for others; more particularly, our mask wearing honors our Lord’s regard for the weak and vulnerable.  And if we apply Romans 14 to this situation, we would use our freedom in Christ to regard the weak from a position of humility rather than superiority.  

There is yet another Christian aspect to mask-wearing.  Since the point of wearing a mask is to help us keep our germs to ourselves, a mask can be a symbol of our taking responsibility for our “stuff” and not inflicting it on others.  In a world of blame and shame, of the good offense as the best defense philosophy, taking responsibility for our germs—literal and metaphorical—is also a most appropriate and powerful way to love others.

But even though wearing a mask can be a contemporary way to demonstrate love, there is still a part of mask wearing that bothers me.  God is the God of truth, and when Christ walked on earth as God Incarnate, He strongly denounced any form of hypocrisy, pretense, and self-righteousness.  The Gospels are full of accounts involving the redemption of ragged sinners, misfits, and outcasts.  The woman wishing to be healed by merely touching Christ’s robe encountered a Lord who rejected her desire to be anonymous, wishing instead to initiate a genuine, personal, real relationship with her.  Wearing a mask carries a historical connotation of hiding something, of pretense, of not being completely honest and transparent: everything that Christianity is not.

So, what can we do about the inherent tension in wearing a mask?  There is no one perfect, universal answer.  I would suggest that a good part of practicing Christianity as we wear a mask involves our thought-life as much as anything else.  If you are like me, I fumble to get my mask secured well enough behind my ears to not slip off, and I become hot and claustrophobic quickly.  It is easy to get cranky!  But if I set my mind to the association between wearing a mask and loving others, I will be in a much better position to treat others with patience and kindness as I wear my mask and deal with those around me.  And if I remain mindful that my mask is for safety purposes and not a screen to hide behind, I can intentionally be genuine and authentic in my words and behaviors.

There is no doubt that this is a time of uncertainty, anxiety, and suffering.  But it is also an opportunity to love others, and in doing so, to invite the Holy Spirit to conform our character to that of Christ in order to love better and more deeply.  May we wear our masks to God’s glory.



Monday, May 4, 2020

Temporal Trials VS. Eternal Truth

In these days of Coronavirus lockdown, time has taken on new dimensions in our household.  Without the rhythms of everyday life out in the world, we are finding it quite easy to lose track of time.  The uniformity of our day-to-day lives that is associated with our virus-imposed seclusion has created a sense of suspended animation that seems quite contrary to linear time.  As the world continues to fight Covid-19 and restrictions remain in place, it is easy to feel that life will never change.  

But the good news is that eternity has nothing to do with Covid-19; the virus has no place there.  The Apostle Paul tells us at the end of I Corinthians 13 that only three things remain: faith, hope, and love.  And while Coronavirus news may dominate our lives at the moment, we would be well served by considering that when all is said and done, it is faith, hope, and love that will define our reality.  At the moment, I would like to take a brief look at faith.

The author of Hebrews describes faith as the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.  It is a settled and secure position that rests on a firm foundation.  The world offers many possible alternative faith foundations: government, science, the intrinsic goodness of people, community, and a generalized spirituality are popular examples.  But the Bible tells us that reliance on such worldly powers will certainly and eventually lead to disappointment rather than fulfillment.  

If we want a faith that will in truth provide the unseen things that we hope for, we must choose our foundation carefully.  In the Gospels of Matthew (Chapter 7) and Luke (Chapter 6), Jesus uses the analogy of the foundation of a home to teach his listeners the importance of an unmovable spiritual foundation: Just as it is important to build a home upon a deep, strong foundation, it is vital to build our spiritual foundation on a solid and immovable base.  In the spiritual realm, it is truly a matter of eternal life and death.  What we believe is what we will have to cling to when storms and trials come.  C.S. Lewis has this to say: “You never know how much you really believe anything until its truth or falsehood becomes a matter of life and death to you.  It is easy to say you believe a rope to be strong and sound as long as you are merely using it to cord a box.  But suppose you had to hang by that rope over a precipice.  Wouldn’t you then first discover how much you really trusted it?”  

While science, government, and the good will of people and community may well be used by God and may help in the midst of this pandemic, they have little to offer in regard to eternity.  If we want to live by eternal values, we must build our faith upon the only truly trustworthy foundation.  We must indeed be sure that our foundation will resist the worst of storms, that our rope will hold us as we dangle from it.  The Apostle Paul makes this observation:

Now if Christ is preached, that He has been raised from the dead, how do some among you say that there is no resurrection of the dead?  But if there is no resurrection of the dead not even Christ has been raised; and if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is vain, your faith is in vain.  Moreover, we are even found to be false witnesses of Go, because we testified against God that He raised Christ, whom He did not raise, if in fact the dead are not raised. For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised; and if Christ has not been raised, your faith is worthless; you are still in dead in your sins.  Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished.  If we have hoped in Christ in this life only, we are of all men most to be pitied. 

It is of the utmost importance that we build our faith on a real, unshakable foundation.  How can we be sure?  We return to the words of Paul:

But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who are asleep….thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. 

The bedrock truth of Christ crucified and Christ risen becomes the foundation of our faith.  We can bet our eternal kingdom on it!  

And once we have our firm eternal foundation of faith in place, we can live in the assurance of things hoped for and the conviction of things unseen in the here and now.  Even though we continue to battle an unseen virus among us, there are other unseen realities of an eternal nature that deserve our attention as well.  Here are just a few:

John 14:2—"In My Father’s house are many dwelling places; if it were not so, I would have told you; for I go to prepare a place for you.  If I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you to Myself, that where I am, there you may be also.”

John 16:33—"These things I have spoken to you, so that in Me you may have peace.  In the world you have tribulation, but take courage; I have overcome the world.”
                                     
Philippians 1:6—For I am confident of this very thing, that He who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus.

As we find ourselves living in unprecedented times, we will need to find our hope and confidence, choose the foundation of our faith, every day, moment by moment.  May we choose wisely and encourage others to do so as well!





Friday, April 10, 2020

Good Friday in a Pandemic

Good Friday.  A day set aside by the Christian church to commemorate the death of Jesus Christ and to remember the sacrifice that He made on the cross in order to redeem us sinners.  For centuries, believers all over the globe have gathered in groups small and large to solemnly celebrate this most significant event.  But now, in the midst of a pandemic, believers are not gathering in groups.  There are very few church services proceeding according to tradition.  But Good Friday is here nonetheless, and this day reminds us that even the darkest of days fall within God's redemptive plan.  But beyond that, Covid-19 bears a striking resemblance to the events of Good Friday in one particular regard.

While many of those struck by the Coronavirus have no or few symptoms, others struggle with it for days if not weeks.  Still others find themselves hospitalized, and some of those require extreme medical intervention: their lungs are so ravaged by the virus that they need a ventilator to do what they cannot do for themselves: Breathe.

Christ died on the cross in order to save a sin-sick world, doing what we cannot do for ourselves: Pay the penalty for our sin.  But while only a small percentage of Coronavirus victims require a ventilator, our sin nature is 100% fatal--for body, soul, and spirit--without the intervention of a Savior.

As we negotiate a "new normal" amidst this pandemic, most sectors of humanity are battling to mitigate suffering and save lives.  We do for people what they cannot do for themselves.  In the end, though, we will all face death in some form or fashion (unless the Lord returns!).  Our sin yields   death to our bodies.  But thanks be to God!  By the death of Christ, He has paid the ransom to rescue us from our sin.  Our souls and spirits will be united with Him for eternity, and we can look forward to receiving new, imperishable bodies.

May Good Friday be good indeed in our hearts and prayers on this holy day.

Friday, March 27, 2020

Encouragement In Anxious Days

“The world is indeed full of peril, and in it there are many dark places; but still there is much that is fair, and though in all lands love is now mingled with grief, it grows perhaps the greater.”
                                             J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings


Thursday, March 19, 2020

Thought For The Day

"He who has God and everything else has no more than he who has God only."

                                                                                               C.S. Lewis
                                                                                                The Weight of Glory

     

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Pandemic Ponderings, #1

These are challenging times, indeed.  The threat or reality of the Coronavirus has changed our lives in real time.  I have read it and heard it many times over the past weeks, but it is worth repeating: God is still here, and He loves us.  As we and those around us struggle and suffer, it is easy to doubt God’s love and even His very existence.  

We are fallen people in a fallen world.  That is our choice, not God’s.  And since He desires most of all a real-deal-of-our-own-free-will relationship with us, He will not suspend the consequences of humankind’s willful independence from Him.  To be sure, our loving and merciful Lord intervenes at times, but the fallen world, and its inhabitants, remain; evil, sin, sickness, and death continue.  And God hates it.  

Since God has chosen to respect our free will in favor of genuine relationship, He manifests His goodness and love by means of redemption.  Christians look forward to our eventual redemption when God accepts Christ’s sacrifice on the cross for our sins, and we are welcomed into heaven.  But redemption is who God is—it is part of His nature and character.  So while we wait for our eventual complete redemption, we can depend on His working His redemptive purposes in us and through us as we go about our lives in the here and now.

Please consider with me the power of the following passages:


Romans 8:28—And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.

Ephesians 5:3-5—And not only this, but we also exult in our tribulations, knowing that tribulation brings about perseverance;  and perseverance, proven character; and proven character, hope;  and hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out within our hearts through the Holy Spirit who was given to us.


Many folks have observed that these are uncharted times.  That may be true for us, but it is most definitely not true for the Lord.  We can depend on His omniscient, sovereign work of redemption in us, through us, and on our behalf.  He’s got this.

Monday, March 16, 2020

Thought for Today, This Week, and This Month

"In the world you have tribulation, but take courage; I have overcome the world.”

                                                                                             Jesus